(via lolzpicx)


archiemcphee:

These awesomely surreal and delightful collages are the work of Eugenia Loli, a California-based collage artist who uses images scanned from vintage magazines and science publications to create bizarre and playful scenes. From a little girl creating our solar system by blowing bubbles to meat loaf that contains galaxies, children riding giant tortoises and planes that drop candy instead of bombs, these pieces reveal Loli’s love of science fiction and unabashed geekiness and we’re completely smitten.

For more of her wonderfully weird collages, follow Loli right here on Tumblr at eugenialoli. Prints of some of her collages are available here. She also offers many of her pieces as downloadable files under the Creative Commons license via her Flickr account.

[via Colossal]


mainstreetmickey:

Princesses + sidekicks

(via mermaidsbeauty)


(via hometwerks)


(via lolzpicx)


(via lolzpicx)


archiemcphee:

Letters are full of awesome potential. Combine enough of them and you’ve got a declaration of love, a sidesplitting joke, a life-saving message in a bottle, a precious secret, a poem, a novel or a Broadway play. Swiss visual artist and graphic designer Cyril Voilloz manipulates letters in a much different fashion. He treats them as visual playthings that can be poked to squirt ink, peeled from their paper, pulled and twisted from a sketchbook onto a computer screen or opened to reveal their internal components. It’s typography that teases 2D letters into 3D objects and we love it.

Visit Cyril Voilloz’s website or follow him on Instagram to check out lots more of his awesome artwork.

[via Visual News]



alexmaeland:

#FlyknitBoyz

alexmaeland:

#FlyknitBoyz



octobra:

when you realize they weren’t waving to u 

image

(via animal-spirits)


Miam Miam // 🙋 Can I have more French toast please!

Miam Miam // 🙋 Can I have more French toast please!


(via lolzpicx)



archiemcphee:

This awesome indoor maze is an interactive art installation currently on exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC. It’s the work of the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), a Copenhagen and New York-based, internationally active group of architects, designers, builders and thinkers.

The BIG Maze is a vast labyrinth of Baltic birch plywood covering an area of roughly 60 square feet. It’s full of twists and turns made of up walls of varying heights that are18 feet tall at their tallest points. Those walls slope in toward the center of the maze, which enables visitors to see more of it as they progress through it. Upon reaching the heart of the maze viewers are rewarded with a complete view of the wooden labyrinth that surrounds them.

"‘The concept is simple: as you travel deeper into a maze, your path typically becomes more convoluted. What if we invert this scenario and create a maze that brings clarity and visual understanding upon reaching the heart of the labyrinth?’, explained Bjarke Ingels."

This design also means that exiting the maze is much easier than solving it. The BIG Maze will be open to the public through September 1, 2014.

Click here for a time-lapse video of the maze’s construction.

[via designboom and Architect Magazine]